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Monday, January 30, 2006

 

Blogging About One Room Schools

From NPR Topics: Education.

Students Flourish in Gold Creek's One-Room School

Gold Creek, Mont., has no stores, gas stations or bars, and its one church is closed. But it is rich in grazing land, and it still has a one-room school that is turning out above-average students.

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Saturday, January 28, 2006

 

Rural Education in the News

The Google news alert for rural education.

Keep a rural eye on state Board of Education
Bangor Daily News - Bangor, ME, USA

Maine is without question a rural state. Seven out of 10 Mainers live in towns or cities with a population less than 10,000. Nearly half of Maine's people reside in communities with a population less than 5,000. Yet, despite Maine's rural character, many of the decisions coming out of Augusta are driven by a mind-set that is insensitive to, and uninformed about, rural Maine. As evidenced by LD 1 and the Essential Programs and Services (EPS) formula, this is especially true with respect to the future of education in Maine's small towns.

Educational forum looks at future
Phillips Bee - Phillips, WI, USA


Kennan resident Gary Edinger said his attendance at the Advancing Rural Wisconsin Policy Forum was time well spent. He was nominated by Phillips School District Superintendent Jerry Trochinski to represent the community at the Jan. 12-13 event in Mosinee sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
State Superintendent of Schools Elizabeth Burmaster had wanted a cross section of people from Wisconsin's rural communities to review and discuss various key issues related to rural concerns. Edinger was pleased to be one of approximately 100 representatives of rural schools, organizations, communities and governments chosen as forum attendees.

Hagel-Harkin Reintroduce Bill to Fund Federal Commitment to IDEA
Southwest Nebraska News - NE, USA

U.S. Senators Chuck Hagel (R-NE) and Tom Harkin (D-IA) reintroduced legislation today to meet the federal government’s commitment to fund 40 percent of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Hagel and Harkin first introduced this legislation in 2001. Cosponsors of the Hagel-Harkin bill include Senators Jeffords (I-VT), Roberts (R-KS), Warner (R-VA), Chafee (R-RI), Snowe (R-ME), Collins (R-ME), Coleman (R-MN), Schumer (D-NY), Lieberman (D-CT), Dayton (D-MN), Kerry (D-MA), Kennedy (D-MA), Mikulski (D-MD), Dodd (D-CT), Reed (D-RI), Murray (D-WA), Bingaman (D-NM), and Johnson (D-SD)."When the federal government created IDEA it committed to funding 40 percent of the costs. For over 30 years, it has failed to meet its obligation and pushed the costs down to states and local governments. This is wrong and it takes resources away from education needs in each state. While we have made progress in increasing IDEA funding over the last 10 years, the federal government is still not close to meeting its commitment. This bipartisan legislation takes a responsible approach to fixing this problem and freeing up critical education funds in states like Nebraska," Hagel said.

The Center for Rural Policy and Development publication to focus ...
Saint Paul Legal Ledger - St. Paul, MN, USA

A St. Peter-based nonprofit organization is launching a new publication today that focuses on rural issues. The Center for Rural Policy and Development is calling the new venture Rural Minnesota Journal. The center's president, Jack Geller, said the first edition features articles from a variety of authorities on public policy areas that affect rural Minnesota. "We are launching this new publication as the first part of a multi-stage strategy designed to elevate the statewide level of civic engagement around issues important to rural Minnesota," Geller said. "Think of it as a way to engage in a long-term, statewide conversation on the status and future of rural Minnesota," he said. The inaugural issue of the Rural Minnesota Journal contains a forward by U.S. Sen. Norm Coleman, R-Minn., and 10 articles by well-known Minnesota researchers, policy analysts and administration officials.

Rural schools banned to collect extra fees
Xinhua - China26 (Xinhuanet)

China's Ministry of Education has forbidden the primary and junior middle schools in rural areas to collect extra fees for students. The schoolmasters will be removed from their posts if extra fees are collected, according to a report of Thursday's China Daily. Students only need to hand in fees for textbooks, workbooks, and accommodation fees, Wang Xuming, spokesman for the ministry, was quoted as saying. "Rural schools are forbidden to collect any other fee aside from the three permitted categories," he said. [See all stories on this topic]

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Friday, January 27, 2006

 

Education Review Publishes Three New Book Reviews

A message from Gene V Glass (glass@ASU.EDU) to the EDREV@ASU.EDU listserve.

Education Review is an open access electronic journal publishing reviews of books in education. The Education Review has published 1,500 reviews since its inception in 1998. All reviews are freely accessible on the internet at:

http://edrev.asu.edu

The Education Review publishes reviews in Spanish and Portuguese as well as in English. The following
books have just been reviewed:

Allen, Matthew. (2004). Smart thinking: Skills for critical understanding and writing. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.

Reviewed by Jill L. Woolums, University of California, Berkeley.

___________________________________________________________

Luhanga, Matthew L.; Makunde, Daniel J.; Mbwette, Tolly S.A.; Chijoriga, Marcellina M.; and Ngirwa, Cleophace A. (2003). Higher Education Reforms in Africa: The University of Dar es Salaam Experience. Dar es Salaam University Press.

Reviewed by Mitiku Adisu.

___________________________________________________________

Franklin, V. P. & Savage, Carter Julian (Eds.) (2004). Cultural Capital and Black Education: African American Communities and the Funding of Black Schooling, l865 to the Present. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing, Inc.

Reviewed by Mary Dolores Guerra, Arizona State University.
These reviews can be accessed under Recent Reviews on the journal homepage http://edrev.asu.edu.

___________________________________________________
Gene V Glass, Editor
glass@asu.edu

Kate Corby, Brief Reviews Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/

Gustavo Fischman, Editor for Spanish & Portuguese
http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

Tags: Education Review, , ,

Thursday, January 26, 2006

 

Call for volunteers to improve China's rural education!

A message from Dan Wang (chipmunk_cn@YAHOO.COM) to the AERA-GSL Graduate Studies Discussion Forum listserve (AERA-GSL@ASU.EDU).

Dear AERA colleagues:

Do you want to apply your educational theories and techniques in a challenging and inspiring practice? Are you interested in learning about China’s rural communities, which inevitably carry the modern imprint but are significantly different from the mainstream lifestyle? Here is a great opportunity! The Rural China Education Foundation (RCEF) invites you to join us in our 2006 Volunteer Program!

RCEF is an international, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization established to improve the lives of
children in rural China through quality education. Quality education refers to curriculum and teaching methods that support well-rounded development, inspire joy in learning, and prepare students to make positive change in their communities. Our Summer Volunteer Program is a unique opportunity for students and young professionals to make a direct impact in rural China through implementing RCEF's quality education in the field and receiving training on rural issues. Please see the Volunteer Information Packet for more information on the program
(http://www.ruralchina.org/index.php?data=OPTION5. The deadline for applications is April 15th 2006; however, selection is on a rolling basis so it is advantageous to apply early. Please be informed that applicants for the Summer Volunteer Program need to be able to communicate in Mandarin.

In addition to our Summer Volunteer Program, RCEF accepts year-round volunteers to do research on education and rural development. At the current stage, our Research and Curriculum Development Committee endeavors to focus its resources on designing and improving curricula for our summer volunteer teaching program and introducing new teaching methods. Successful accomplishment of these tasks rests on our knowledge about the variety of aspects regarding China's rural society, our continuous reflections on our own teaching practices, and most importantly making meaningful connections between the existing research findings and our own practices. For these purposes, RCEF is in urgent need for talents with expertise in education as well as in a wide range of social and hard sciences. Expertise in education, community development, sociology, anthropology, social work, China studies, agriculture, environmental studies, is especially welcomed. There is no deadline for applying to be year-round volunteers.

It has proven to be a life-changing and spirit-lifting experience for our volunteers to work in such an enthusiastic but also thoughtful team on the meaningful cause of China's rural education. One of the greatest things about RCEF is its relatively flat hierarchy which allows individuals with initiatives and innovative ideas to make a direct impact on the organization. The success of our organization really rests in the hands of our volunteers!! We believe that the educational professionals in AERA can make a significant impact on China’s rural education. We are looking forward to hearing from you soon!

The application form is available at:

http://www.ruralchina.org/index.php?data=OPTION5

Further information about RCEF and the volunteer program is available at www.ruralchina.org. Inquiries can be directed to recruitment@ruralchina.org.

Dan Wang
Co-Chair
Research and Curriculum Development Committee
Rural China Education Foundation
Email: dwang03@syr.edu
__________________________________________________
赶快注册雅虎超大容量免费邮箱?
http://cn.mail.yahoo.com

AERA-GSL AERA Graduate Studies Forum
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Wednesday, January 25, 2006

 

Updated CTB/McGraw-Hill Summer Internship - Research/Ed Measurement

A message from Julio Sanclemente (Julio_Sanclemente@CTB.COM) to the AERA-GSL Graduate Studies Discussion Forum listserve (AERA-GSL@ASU.EDU)

CTB 2006 Summer Internship Program

The CTB/McGraw-Hill summer internship program allows doctoral students an opportunity to conduct research and gain practical experience in educational measurement. Interns will collaborate with a CTB Research Scientist on a project, attend research seminars, and learn about various operational aspects of testing programs. A goal of the internship program is to facilitate interest among graduate students in pursuing a career in educational measurement. The program is also intended to assist in increasing the number of women and minorities in the field of educational measurement.

Duration: June 1, 2006 through July 28, 2006 (eight weeks). Some flexibility in these dates will be allowed if they conflict with a school schedule.

Location: Interns will work at CTB's offices in Monterey, California or Denver, Colorado. Compensation: $750 per week (a total of $6000 over eight weeks), plus transportation expenses to and from Monterey or Denver.

Who should apply: Graduate students currently enrolled in a doctoral program for at least one year, whose major field of study is one of the following areas: psychometrics, educational measurement, psychology, cognitive science, or statistics.

Research Focus: Technical issues will be investigated in an area such as scaling, IRT estimation, equating, computer-based testing, or diagnostic assessment using real or simulated data under the direction of a CTB Senior Research Scientist.

To apply for this Internship please submit your resume via the Employment section on our website at: www.ctb.com

In the "Keyword or Job Number Search" field type in 060000005B

In addition, please mail the following application documents to:

Julio Sanclemente
Senior Recruiter
Human Resources Department
20 Ryan Ranch Road
Monterey, CA 93940

Application documents must be postmarked no later than March 15, 2006.

Qualifications

Required:

Graduate students currently enrolled in a doctoral program for at least one year, whose major field of study is one of the following areas: psychometrics, education, psychology, cognitive science, or statistics.

AERA-GSL AERA Graduate Studies Forum
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Tuesday, January 24, 2006

 

Another Blog About Rural Education

Rural Living, High-speed Internet Access? at Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes

The state of Maine is working on an internet project to bring wireless Internet service to 90 percent of Maine communities that meet a population threshold (five people per square mile) by 2010.

EDUCAUSE RSS Recent Recent Library Submissions Listings, January 12, 2006. [Conversation]

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Monday, January 23, 2006

 

Call for Papers - AEQ - Grad Student Work Welcome

Taken from Dan McCollum (McCollum@UHCL.EDU) to the AERA-GSL Graduate Studies Discussion Forum (AERA-GSL@ASU.EDU).

Academic Exchange Quarterly Summer 2006, Volume 10, Issue 2,

http://www.rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/ontstu.htm

The above link is a call for papers for a newer journal in education. It isa double-blind, peer reviewed journal that is available in print and webformats and has 26,000+ readers. The journal covers many topics in andrelated to education. The link above will take you to a special section onStudent Perceptions, Beliefs, MOTIVATIONS, or Attitudes. Articles concerningadult students (or students of any age) are welcome. For more informationclick the link above.

Thank you.

Dan McCollum, Ph.D.
mccollum@cl.uh.edu
Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations - Research
University of Houston - Clear Lake
2700 Bay Area Blvd.
Box 252
Suite B-1119-02
Houston, TX 77058
Phone: 281-283-3604
FAX 281-283-3630

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Sunday, January 22, 2006

 

Rural Education in the News

The Google News Alert for rural education for this week.

ECU notes: College acquires Hubble mural
Greenville Daily Reflector - Greenville, NC, USA

East Carolina University's College of Education Department of Mathematics and Science Education was one of two locations in North Carolina selected to participate in a national unveiling of a mural-sized image of the Great Orion Nebula. The photograph of the nebula shows the turbulent star birth cloud recorded by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in exquisite and unprecedented detail. ECU and the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh each unveiled images on Wednesday.

That education pill
Hindustan Times - India

The Annual Status of Education Report was conceived by an educational NGO as a citizen’s audit when it embarked on its survey of 9,252 rural schools in 28 states, with villages chosen at random. The purpose was to understand how rural populations viewed existing facilities and infrastructure and whether these were being efficiently used. The results that have been reported should make more than just officials at the state level sit up. The figures that have emerged paint a dreary picture. The states that are considered to have fairly good school infrastructure, like Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Gujarat are inculcating poor learning abilities in their children, while the states of Bihar and Chhattisgarh which lack in basic school facilities, have turned out brighter students with better cognitive abilities. [See all stories on this topic]

Digital Divide Separates Rural, Urban Internet Users
TechNewsWorld - Sherman Oaks, CA, USA

Access to high-speed Internet can differ substantially between urban and rural dwellers, according to a new report by the Center for Rural Policy and Development. The center, based in St. Peter, Minn., says people in rural areas have a harder time getting broadband access at competitive and reasonable prices. The study shows, for example, that about 44 percent of homes in the Twin Cities area have high-speed Internet. That compares with just over 27 percent in rural Minnesota. [See all stories on this topic]

Dora and Elida among quality school districts
Portales News-Tribune - Portales, NM, USA

When it comes to meeting No Child Left Behind mandates, small schools reign, and state officials have noticed. Nine rural school districts in eastern New Mexico, including Dora and Elida have been named “quality districts” by the Public Education Department and Gov. Bill Richardson. Those nine districts, in addition to 21 others across the state, will be officially recognized for making Adequate Yearly Progress in an awards ceremony Jan. 20 at the Capitol. [See all stories on this topic]

BOTSWANA: Paying school fees no sign of enthusiasm for new policy ...
African News Dimension - Johannesburg, South Africa

In an interview with AND, presidential spokesman Jeff Ramsay said despite delays in the assessment process of those parents who applied for exemption from paying, the new school term had started without any of the problems which education stakeholders feared would affect the sector because of the re-introduction of school fees.“Everything has gone well so far. The parents are still paying and we expect the education ministry to make a full statement shortly. All the children are going to school. Even those whose parents applied for exemption but have not been assessed will remain are at school,” Ramsay told A.N.D. [See all stories on this topic]

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Saturday, January 21, 2006

 

NSF Workshop - Graduate Student Application

And a third this week from Barbara L. McCombs (barbara.mccombs@du.edu) to the aera_division_c-announce@listserv.aera.net listserve.

NSF WORKSHOP — May 8 • 2006 — LOS ANGELES
Graduate Student Application

In conjunction with the next Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), scheduled for May 10–12, 2006, we are planning a combination of workshop discussions and conference presentations focused on new perspectives on women, games and computing. The workshop “Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat”, funded by the National Science Foundation, will discuss on May 8th, 2006, the attractiveness of multi-player games, efforts to bring girls into game design, and the appeal of casual games. The workshop will bring together researchers, designers and business people to discuss and review current trends in the area of women and games. Topics for the workshop will include: The New Girl Games? (women and girls in online role playing games), Bringing Girls on Board (girls and women programming games), and Moving Beyond Commercial Games (casual games, serious games, educational games). We will then join on May 9th the Education Arcade conference and visit on May 10th the E3 exhibits.

We are inviting doctoral students to join us in this workshop and discussions. Applicants must have completed their dissertation proposal (or equivalent) and can be at any stage in their dissertation work. Funding from the National Science Foundation is available for up to 8 students, covering travel, hotel, and Education Arcade conference registration and E3 exhibit pass. International students are welcome to apply.

For more information on workshop, please contact kafai@gseis.ucla.edu
To apply, please submit the following materials to workapp@gseis.ucla.edu

These materials should be in one file (word or pdf). If your professor wishes to send the letter separately, it should have a subject line that states:

workshop_student
February 15, 2006 — Submissions due by 11:59pm PST
March 1, 2006 — Notification of acceptance by email to submitter

Participants for the workshop will be selected on the basis of their anticipated contribution to the workshop goals. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

---
Barbara L. McCombs, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist and Director
Human Motivation, Learning, and Development Center
University of Denver Research Institute
2050 E. Iliff Avenue, Boettcher East - Room 224
Denver, CO 80208
(303) 871-4245 Office
(303) 871-2716 Fax

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Friday, January 20, 2006

 

AERA Division K Graduate Student Seminar

A message from Virginia Stead (virginiastead@sympatico.ca) taken from the ccse@mailman.srv.ualberta.ca listserve.

Dear Grad Students:

The application deadline to participate in the AERA Division K Graduate Student Seminar has been extended to February 1, 2006. The seminar will take place during the afternoon of Thursday April 6 and the morning of Friday, April 7, just prior to the beginning of the Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

The link to application instructions and forms can be found at http://www.aera.net/divisions/?id=76

If you are, or know, a graduate student at the dissertation stage who has not yet applied, this is a marvelous opportunity, not to be missed.

***************************************
Christine Sleeter, Ph.D.
Vice President, Division K
Professor Emerita, California State University Monterey Bay
Phone: 831-656-9759
Mailing address: 118 1/2 Dunecrest Ave., Monterey CA 93940

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Division C New Faculty Mentoring Program -- Call for Participants

Another one from Barbara L. McCombs (barbara.mccombs@du.edu) to the aera_division_c-announce@listserv.aera.net listserve.

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS
The Division C New Faculty Mentoring Program

The Division C New Faculty Mentoring Program (NFMP) provides Division C members who are new to the academy with an opportunity to receive both collective and individual mentoring from renowned scholars in their field(s). At the 2006 Annual Meeting, the NFMP will provide a half-day seminar for 15 young scholars, paired each participant with an individual mentor, and host an evening reception all participants, mentors, and seminar speakers.

New faculty and recent graduates (within the past 4 years) who would like to participate should submit the following application materials as email attachments to Helenrose Fives (helenrose.fives@ttu.edu ), co-chair of the program, by Monday February 6, 2006 (deadline extended!)

§ A cover letter that:
1) states why the applicant is interested in participating in the Division C Mentoring Program,
2) describes the applicant’s research interests and projects, and
3) indicates potential mentors.

**This information is vital to the successful identification of appropriate mentors.**

§ A vita that includes name, address, institution, telephone, fax, e-mail, educational background,

Participants will be selected based on faculty status and research interests in the domain of learning and instruction. There is no cost for seminar participation and a small stipend will be offered to participants to help defray expenses. To be eligible, participants must be members of Division C and must register for the annual meeting. Also, individuals who are accepted will be asked to submit a manuscript or other scholarly work to their assigned mentors one month prior to the conference.

In addition to new faculty applicants, we will also be seeking potential mentors. If you are interested in serving in this capacity, please contact either of the New Faculty Mentoring Committee co-chairs, Michelle M. Buehl (mbuehl@memphis.edu) or Helenrose Fives (helenrose.fives@ttu.edu).

---
Barbara L. McCombs, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist and Director
Human Motivation, Learning, and Development Center
University of Denver Research Institute
2050 E. Iliff Avenue, Boettcher East - Room 224
Denver, CO 80208
(303) 871-4245 Office
(303) 871-2716 Fax

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Thursday, January 19, 2006

 

Call for submissions - Self-Regulation of Learning

From Barbara L. McCombs (barbara.mccombs@du.edu) to the aera_division_c-announce@listserv.aera.net listserve.


I would like to bring your attention to the following call for submission for Academic Exchange Quarterly's second special edition on Self-Regulation of Learning (please see http://www.rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/5self.htm). Hefer Bembenutty, Feature Editor, has emailed saying that after the great success of the first special edition (Winter 2005) on Self-Regulation of Learning, the Academic Exchange Quarterly will have a second special edition on Self-Regulation of Learning (Winter 2006).

Best wishes,

Barbara L. McCombs, Division C Vice-President

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Self-Regulation of Learning
Academic Exchange Quarterly
Winter 2006, Volume 10, Issue 4
Expanded issue up to 400+ pages.

Articles on various topics plus the following special section.

Self-Regulation of Learning

Feature Editor:
Hefer Bembenutty, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Secondary Education and Youth Services
Queens College, NY
E-mail: bembenuttyseys@yahoo.com

Focus:

Self-regulation of learning examines the process by which learners set goals, monitor, regulate, and control their learning, motivation for learning, behavior, actions, and guide their effort to secure academic achievement. Self regulation of learning investigates the contextual, environmental, and social cognitive factors that guide and promote learning. Self-regulation of learning examines the conditions that enact successful learning as well as those that constrain academic self-regulation and explores the development of self-regulatory skills and interventions that improve students’ self-directed and proactive learning. Self-regulation of learning considers empirical and theoretical contributions dealing with improving students’ self-regulation of learning. Quantitative and qualitative methods as well as theoretical analyses with practical applications addressing the cognitive processing, motivation for learning, the role of teachers, classroom practice, educational interventions, and individual differences including gender, ethnicity, and exceptionality, will be considered.

Who May Submit:

Manuscripts are welcome from researchers, teachers, administrators, professors, and graduate students co-authored with professors. The contextual settings of learning could be in traditional classrooms, sport or medical settings, college environment, vocational or training centers, elementary to secondary education, and higher education. Please identify your submission with keyword: SELF

Submission deadline:

Any time until the end of August 2006; see details for other deadline options like early, regular, and short.

Submission Procedure:

http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm or http://www.higher-ed.org/AEQ/rufen1.htm

---
Barbara L. McCombs, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist and Director
Human Motivation, Learning, and Development Center
University of Denver Research Institute
2050 E. Iliff Avenue, Boettcher East - Room 224
Denver, CO 80208
(303) 871-4245 Office
(303) 871-2716 Fax

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Wednesday, January 18, 2006

 

Education Review Publishes Reviews

Another message from Gene V Glass (glass@ASU.EDU) to the EDREV@ASU.EDU listserve.

Education Review is an open access electronic journal publishing reviews of books in education. The Education Review has published 1,400 reviews since its inception in 1998. All reviews are freely accessible on the internet at:

http://edrev.asu.edu

The Education Review publishes reviews in Spanish and Portuguese as well as in English. The following book has just been reviewed:

Carnoy, Martin; Jacobsen, Rebecca; Mishel, Lawrence & Rothstein, Richard. (2005). The Charter School Dust-Up: Examining the Evidence on Enrollment and Achievement. Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute and New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Reviewed by Larisa Warhol, Arizona State University.

Schmidt, Patricia Ruggiano. (Ed). (2005). Preparing educators to communicate and connect with families and communities. Greenwich, CN: Information Age Publishing.

Reviewed by Ruth Rees, Queen's University.

This review can be accessed under Recent Reviews on the journal homepage https://punts1.cc.uga.edu/cgi-bin/fetch.cgi?url=http%3A%2F%2Fedrev.asu.edu.
___________________________________________________
Gene V Glass, Editor
glass@asu.edu

Kate Corby, Brief Reviews Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/

Gustavo Fischman, Editor for Spanish & Portuguese
http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

Tags: Education Review, , ,

Monday, January 16, 2006

 

AERA's Post-Doctoral and Dissertation Support Programs

Dear SIG Chairs:

Happy New Year! I hope you are resuming work after the holidays full ofenergy and with a renewed sense of purpose. I am writing to enlist yourassistance in spreading the word regarding some of AERA's importantfellowship support programs. We ask you to encourage strong candidatesto apply and to circulate this e-mail to others who might apply orrecommend these programs to potentially interested applicants.

The first is the AERA-AIR (A2) Fellows Program. This is a jointinitiative between the American Educational Research Association and TheAmerican Institutes for Research (AIR). This program aims to build thetalent pool of highly skilled education researchers experienced inworking on large-scale studies in major research environments. Up tothree fellows will be selected annually for a two-year, rotationalposition in Washington, DC. More information is available athttps://punts1.cc.uga.edu/cgi-bin/fetch.cgi?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aera.net%2Ffellowships%2F%3Fid%3D698. The deadline for the A2 FellowsProgram is February 15.

The second is the AERA-ETS Postdoctoral Fellowship. This is a jointinitiative between the American Educational Research Association and theEducational Testing Service (ETS). This program provides intensiveresearch and training opportunities in such areas as educationalmeasurement, assessment design, psychometrics, statistical analyses,large-scale evaluations, and other tools for explaining student progressand achievement. Up to four fellows will be selected for a two-yearresearch position at the ETS campus in Princeton, NJ. More informationis available at https://punts1.cc.uga.edu/cgi-bin/fetch.cgi?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aera.net%2Ffellowships%2F%3Fid%3D702. The deadlinefor the AERA-ETS Postdoctoral Fellowship is February 15.

In addition to these Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs, the AERA alsooffer dissertation support through its Minority Fellowship Program. Thisprogram aims to enhance the competitiveness of outstanding minorityscholars for academic appointments at major research universities bysupporting their research and writing, and by providing mentoring andguidance toward completion of their doctoral studies. AERA will award upto three doctoral fellowships this year. More information is availableat https://punts1.cc.uga.edu/cgi-bin/fetch.cgi?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aera.net%2Ffellowships%2F%3Fid%3D88. The deadline for applicationis March 1.

Finally, the AERA Grant Program provides dissertation support and smallgrants for researchers who conduct studies of education policy andpractice using quantitative methods and including the analysis of datafrom the large-scale data sets sponsored by National Center forEducation Statistics (NCES) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).This Program too has a March 1, 2006 deadline. More information isavailable at http://www.aera.net/grantsprogram/.

I can say much, much more about each of these. Please call me at202-223-9485 x105 or email tmartinez@aera.net if you want more detailedinformation. Do encourage any potential applicants to do the same andto help us in this outreach effort.

Thank you for circulating this information. See you in San Francisco!

Teresita Martinez Vergne
Interim Director of Social Justice and Professional Development
American Educational Research Association
1230 17th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-223-9485, ext. 105 - phone
202-775-1824 -- fax
tmartinez@aera.net -- email
http://www.aera.net -- website

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Sunday, January 15, 2006

 

Call for Applications to the 2006 Graduate Student Seminar

A message from Barbara L. McCombs - barbara.mccombs@du.edu - to the aera_division_c-announce@listserv.aera.net listserve.

American Educational Research Association - Division C
Graduate Student Seminar 2006
CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Plans are already underway for the 2006 Graduate Student Seminar, which will be held on April 6 (Thursday) 9:00 am - 5:00 pm and April 7 (Friday) 9:00 am - 12:00 pm in conjunction with the AERA Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Lisa Bendixen is chair of the 2006 seminar, assisted by co-chair Douglas Kauffman.

The purpose of the seminar is to mentor graduate students, who are members of AERA Division C, into national-level research on learning and instruction and into professions associated with educational research. The seminar is intended for full-time, advanced level doctoral students who are approaching the dissertation phase of their programs. Seminar topics typically include: designing and publishing research on learning and instruction, searching and competing for academic positions, perfecting the vita, and surviving the first years as a faculty member.

Students who would like to apply to participate in the Graduate Student Seminar should submit the following materials as email attachments to the chair of the seminar (lisa.bendixen@unlv.edu) February 10, 2006:

A limited number of participants will be selected for the 2006 Seminar based on advanced graduate status, research interests in the domain of learning and instruction, and clarity of research interests. Seminar attendance is at no cost to participants, and a small stipend is generally offered to those selected to help defray expenses. To be eligible, students must be members of Division C and must register for the annual meeting.

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Saturday, January 14, 2006

 

Resenas Educativas/Education Review Publishes Review of Herrera: "Tradicion y valores en la posmodernidad: Los nuevos retos de la educacion"

A message from Gene V Glass (glass@ASU.EDU) taken from the EDREV@ASU.EDU listserve.

Reseñas Educativas/Education Review es una publicación académica con formato electrónico de reseñas de libros sobre educación. Reseñas Educativas/Education Review, se creo en 1998 y desde entonces ha publicado casi 1,400 reseñas. Todas las reseñas pueden ser consultadas gratuitamente em la siguiente dirección:

http://edrev.asu.edu

Reseñas Educativas/Education Review publica reseñas en español, portugués e inglés. El siguiente libro acaba de ser reseñado:

Herrera Torres, Moisés y Leyton Gutierrez, Alma E. (Coords.) (2004). Tradición y valores en la posmodernidad: Los nuevos retos de la educación. México: ITESM-CREFAL.

Reseñado por Marcelo De Stefano.
Esta reseña puede ser consultada en Reseñas Recientes en la homepage de la revista:

http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

___________________________________________

Editor para Español y Portugués
Gustavo E. Fischman
Arizona State University
Laboratorio de Políticas Públicas (UERJ)
Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

Editor General (inglês)
Gene V Glass
Arizona State University

Editora de Reseñas Breves (inglês)
Kate Corby
Michigan State University
__________________________________________________________________

Education Review is an electronic journal publishing reviews of recent books in education. The Education Review has published over 1400 reviews since its inception in 1998. All reviews are freely accessible on the internet at:

http://edrev.asu.edu

The Education Review publishes reviews in Spanish and Portuguese as well as in English. The following book
has just been reviewed:

Herrera Torres, Moisés y Leyton Gutierrez, Alma E. (Coords.) (2004). Tradición y valores en la posmodernidad: Los nuevos retos de la educación. México: ITESM-CREFAL.

Reseñado por Marcelo De Stefano.
This review can be accessed as the first item under Recent Reviews on the journal homepage.

http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

___________________________________________________

Gustavo Fischman
Editor for Spanish & Portuguese
fischman@asu.edu

Gene V Glass
Editor
glass@asu.edu

Kate Corby
Brief Reviews Editor
corby@msu.edu

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Education Review Publishes Review of Henderson and Kesson: "Curriculum Wisdom: Educational Decisions in Democratic Societies"

A message from Gene V Glass - glass@ASU.EDU to the EDREV@ASU.EDU listserve.

Education Review is an open access electronic journal publishing reviews of books in education. The Education Review has published 1,400 reviews since its inception in 1998. All reviews are freely accessible on the internet at:

http://edrev.asu.edu

The Education Review publishes reviews in Spanish and Portuguese as well as in English. The following
book has just been reviewed:

Henderson, James G. & Kesson, Kathleen R. (2004). Curriculum Wisdom: Educational Decisions in Democratic Societies. Upper Saddle River, NJ and Columbus, OH: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Reviewed by Laurel K. Chehayl, Kent State University.
This review can be accessed under Recent Reviews on the journal homepage http://edrev.asu.edu.
___________________________________________________
Gene V Glass, Editor
glass@asu.edu

Kate Corby, Brief Reviews Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/

Gustavo Fischman, Editor for Spanish & Portuguese
http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

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Friday, January 13, 2006

 

Rural Education in the News

Only a few this week from our Google News Alert for rural education.

Jiangsu to promote rural compulsory education
Xinhua - China

East China's Jiangsu Province is expected to spend 2 billion yuan (some 246 million US dollars) this year to help exempt all education tuition and fees for students during their compulsory education period, according to the provincial government. The province will continue to provide free textbooks and subsidies for the students from needy families, said an official with the provincial government. Students in central Jiangsu will also receive free textbooks, according to the official. He said the total number of beneficiaries will reach 800,000 this year.

Pens for pupils
Bizcommunity.com - Cape Town, South Africa

Internet Service Provider MWEB has partnered with DSTV, Pick n' Pay and SMILE to launch the Big Stationery Drive, an initiative that hopes to help right the future of education in our country and to provide learners with the tools for a better education. Daniela Browne, director of SMILE, a national community-based education non-profit organization, says: "Learners in South Africa's rural schools don't even have pencils and when they do, they're forced to share. Imagine sharing one pencil with three of your friends. I see this everyday." [See all stories on this topic]

Schoolbags for 10,000 pupils in rural areas
Malay Mail - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Some 10,000 underprivileged pupils from schools in rural areas will each receive a new schoolbag.
Rotary Club of Kuala Lumpur president Low Kok Hwa yesterday presented a token school bag to Education Ministry director-general Datuk Ahamad Sipon.“Most of the parents’ incomes are affected because of the increase in fuel prices, so we would like to ease their burden by providing them with the free schoolbags,” said schoolbags distribution organising chairman Chan Kam Fatt.He said the luminous band on the 10,000 schoolbags is an added safety feature as it will alert motorists to school children.

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Wednesday, January 11, 2006

 

What Do You Think Thus Far? - National Delurking Week

I have been informed by a friend of mine, Nate, over at Cognitive Dissonance that this is National Delurking Week. What this means is that this is the week to come out of the shadows and instead of just reading what is posted here to get involved yourself by posting a comment.

In honor of this national week (and given the fact that it is now more than one year since our first entry), I'd invite you to comment on this entry to provide us with some feedback on things that we have been doing that you have enjoyed and/or found useful, things we have been doing that you have not enjoyed and found useless, or any other suggestions you have for us.

So show your support of National Delurking Week and post a comment with your feedback.

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One Room Schools Again

National Public Radio continues their look at one room schools.

One-Room Schools Holding on in Rural America

One-room schools still exist in America. They are a legacy of a less mobile, more rural time in American history. Mostly serving isolated communities, the remaining schools require one teacher to educate children of varying ages at the same time in a single classroom. In 1919 there were 190,000 one-room schools scattered all around the American countryside. Now there are fewer than 400 left. Most of the remaining one-room schools are concentrated in a few states in the western part of the United States. Montana has the most -- between 85 and 100. Nebraska is number two, with roughly 75 one-room schools.

Taken from NPR Topics: Education.

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Tuesday, January 10, 2006

 

Education Review Publishes Peer-reviewed Essay Review - Vol. 9 No. 2

Taken from the EDREV@ASU.EDU listserve, a message from Gene V Glass <glass@ASU.EDU>.

The Education Review is an open access journal that has published reviews of books in education continuously since 1998. Its address on the world wide web is

http://edrev.asu.edu

Education Review has inaugurated a new section of peer-reviewed essay reviews, and welcomes submissions of this new type. Essay reviews are peer-reviewed articles that examine in depth one or more recent books of
particular significance on a single topic. Essay reviews are generally between 7,500 and 10,000 words in length, although longer reviews are welcome. For instructions on submitting a manuscript for possible publication, see the website.

Education Review has just published the following article:

The Continuing Quest for Equal Schools: An Essay Review
Donal E. Mulcahy
City University of New York

Gresson, Aaron D. (2004). America’s Atonement: Racial Pain, Recovery Rhetoric, and the Pedagogy of Healing. New York: Peter Lang.
Pp. xv + 140
$29.95 ISBN 0-8204-3145-1

Perlstein, David. (2004). Justice, Justice: School Politics and the Eclipse of Liberalism. New York: Peter Lang.
Pp. 159
$29.95 ISBN 0-8204-6787-1

[AND]

Freire, Paulo. (2004). Pedagogy of Indignation. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

Reviewed by Ramin Farahmandpur, Portland State University.

Citation: Mulcahy, D. E. (2006, January 9). The continuing quest for equal schools: An essay review.
Education Review, 9(2). Retrieved [date] from http://edrev.asu.edu/essays/v9n2index.html

_________________________________
Gene V Glass, Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu

Kate Corby, Brief Reviews Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/

Gustavo Fischman, Editor for Spanish & Portuguese
http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

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Monday, January 09, 2006

 

Conference Presentations on Rural Education

Yesterday, the 19th Annual Conference on Interdisciplinary Qualitative Studies that I was attending concluded. It was an interesting conference focused around a wide variety of scholars from diffrent fields who all share an interest in qualitative research.

The purpose of this entry is to share some of the sessions that were schedule which had a focus on rural education. I say which were scheduled, because unfortunately the project leader of the first session (the panel on educational research below) had an unforeseeable circumstanc occur the day before the conference and contacted the conference organizers with their inability to come. As for the poster session listed below, I'm not sure why they were not in attendance.

Below is the abstracts from the conference program and I have added links to the e-mail addresses of the presenters in case their topics are of interest to you and you would like to contact them about their work.

Educational Research

Lamenting the Loss of Mom & Pop: The Changing Terrain of Rural Appalachian Schools
Communities both Resisting & Embracing Multinational Corporate Development
- Mary Jean Ronan Herzog, Western Carolina University

Conflicts are inevitable in communities where change occurs rapidly or where dramatic change occurs over time. Rural communities and schools faced tremendous change throughout the 20th Century and, with advancing broadband networks and communications, are facing even more dramatic change. This symposium examines issues confronting rural schools and communities.

Country as Cornbread: Up From Appalachian English?
- Barbara Cary, Mars Hill College

The Teaching Force: Who wants to teach in rural Appalachia and why?
- Sharon Dole, Western Carolina University

You Can Go Home Again: A Case Study of the Consolidation, Closing and Restoration of Barnardsville Elementary School
- Gail Buckner, Buncombe County Schools

Jim Brown, Session Chair, Mars Hill College

Poster Presentations

Identifying Barriers and Supports to Rural Students’ Career Development and Educational Aspirations
- Amber N. Hughes, Vanderbilt University

This study provides information for school counselors to use when providing educational support to rural students. Previous research indicates a need for additional support due to a lack of positive parental influences on rural adolescents’ educational aspirations. In-depth interviews with rural high school students will serve to supplement existing quantitative research on factors influencing educational aspirations with qualitative data, as well as provide a greater understanding of how school counselors can better influence students’ aspirations.

I should also note that if any of our memberships or readership of this blog would like to submit their own notes from sessions that they attend at any conferences which they feel may be of interest to the members of the AERA Rural Education SIG, feel free to send them to me at mkb-at-uga-dot-edu.

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Saturday, January 07, 2006

 

Blogging About Rural Education

We are finding new items about rural education all over the place lately. This one comes to us from the blog of Michael Arnold at Mr. Rural ED.

2005 Mr. Rural ED Awards

2005 was a pretty good year for rural schools. The U.S. Department of Education made significant efforts to better serve rural schools and one of its comprehensive centers sponsored an important rural education summit. There were also some very good rural education articles published. On the downside, the Regional Educational Laboratories continued to neglect their obligations to rural schools, but at least they’re consistent. [Continued]

These two entries from a blog called think:lab...

Busing and Rural Consolidation

Life is about trade-offs. And sometimes for a kid that means getting up very, very early to go to school so that they can have a 'worthy' school to go to in the first place. A fair trade, right? Sometimes its a simple story about a simple kid that gets my attention: "Morning comes early for 17-year-old Monica Shaffer. She’s outside at 6:40, waiting high on Brown’s Mountain outside of Hacker Valley, West Virginia, with her younger brother, Raymond, when the feeder bus pulls off Replete Road. It’s the first leg of their 40-mile, nearly 90-minute trip to Webster County High School, located almost in the dead center of the state and the only secondary school in this sweeping, mountainous county. -- "Long Way Home", Teacher Magazine, 1-2.05 issue" A side personal note: When I was a new 9th grader, I found myself on a new bus route...and facing very different social expecations. [Continued]

Small Schools Planning Institute Only 2 Weeks Away!

was reminded of this great event while meeting with Dr. Michael Klonsky and his Small Schools Workshop team while up in Chicago through the holidays...and with only 2 weeks left to go, thought I'd toss out a reminder that there is still time to register: "5th Annual Small Schools Institute, 1.17-19.06, Clearwater, Florida." Link to register. [Continued]

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Friday, January 06, 2006

 

Rural Education in the News

From the Google News Alert for the terms rural and education.

United States Committed To Helping Afghan Women Succeed
Washington File - Washington, DC, USA

The United States is working to enable Afghan women to participate and take leadership roles in the political and economic life of Afghanistan, according to a fact sheet released January 1 by the U.S. Department of State. The U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council was created by President Bush and Afghan President Hamid Karzai in January 2002. This partnership between the United States and the Afghan government and private institutions seeks to support political and economic empowerment for Afghan women. The council, which also focuses on education and health, has received significant support from U.S. businesses and government.

Districts denied Abbott status
Philadelphia Inquirer - Philadelphia, PA, USA

Although their needs are great, 17 rural New Jersey school districts will not get the Abbott special-needs designation they had sought, the state Board of Education ruled yesterday. Instead, the board called for the Department of Education to immediately begin devising a needs assessment for those districts. And in a decision that could have a wide impact, the board called on the department to preside over sweeping changes for all schools, and possibly changes to the school-funding formula. [See all stories on this topic]

Nitish will police school attendance
Daily News & Analysis - Mumbai, India

Bihar’s new government has decided it’s time to enforce ‘education for all’. Now every child over five will have to attend school. To ensure this the government will use Bihar’s police. Police stations have been told to ensure that all children in their area attend school. This directive applies from the village council upwards. Chief Minister Nitish Kumar has told bureaucrats that education for all should no longer remain a slogan. He has suggested that women and mothers, especially in rural areas, be involved in the scheme as they play a greater role in a child’s elementary education. He, in fact, suggested that the parents’ committee formed in every primary and secondary school be renamed mothers’ committee. [See all stories on this topic]

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Thursday, January 05, 2006

 

Education Review Publishes

This was taken from the EDREV@ASU.EDU, a message originally from Gene V Glass glass@ASU.EDU.

The Education Review is an open access journal that has published reviews of books in education continuously since 1998. Its address on the world wide web is:

http://edrev.asu.edu

Education Review has inaugurated a new section of peer-reviewed essay reviews, and welcomes submissions of this new type. Essay reviews are special peer-reviewed articles that examine in depth one or more recent books of particular significance on a single topic. Essay reviews are generally between 7,500 and 10,000 words in length, although longer reviews are welcome. For instructions on submitting a manuscript for possible publication, see the website.

As the second offering of this new type of review, the Education Review has just published the following article:

Bees and Foxes, Spiders and Hedgehogs
Pieter Vanhuysse
University of Haifa
An Essay Review of:

Citation: Vanhuysse, P. (2006, January 1). Bees and foxes, spiders and hedgehogs. Education Review, 9(1). Retrieved [date] from http://edrev.asu.edu/essays/v9n1index.html.

The following books have just been reviewed:

Robinson, S. N. (2004). History of Immigrant Female Students in Chicago Public Schools, 1900-1950. N.Y: Peter Lang.

Reviewed by Karen Monkman, DePaul University, and Angelica Rivera, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Slaughter, Sheila & Rhoades, Gary. (2004). Academic Capitalism and the New Economy: Markets, State and Higher Education. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Reviewed by Rebecca Barber.

These reviews can be accessed under Recent Reviewson the journal homepage http://edrev.asu.edu.
_________________________________
Gene V Glass, Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu

Kate Corby, Brief Reviews Editor
http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/

Gustavo Fischman, Editor for Spanish & Portuguese
http://edrev.asu.edu/indexs.html

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Wednesday, January 04, 2006

 

Rural Ed Makes eSchool News

From the December 28, 2005 edition (i.e., Vol.3, No.52) of eSchool News Online...

Supe, 30, shatters rural stereotypes
By Laura Ascione, Assistant Editor, eSchool News

December 7, 2005—Thirty-year-old Bart Banfield, one of the youngest superintendents in the nation, was still in school when the internet exploded into the mainstream of American life. As a result, he can appreciate firsthand how today's technology tools are transforming teaching and learning. This firsthand experience has helped Banfield lead Oklahoma's Stidham Public Schools--a one-school district with just 135 students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade--to the forefront of technology integration.

Banfield's district is quickly breaking stereotypes about rural schools and limited access to technology. Dubbed "Oklahoma's most progressive dependent school," Stidham aims to "provide a progressive learning environment that challenges and encourages students to recognize and maximize their unique learning potential in the 21st century," Banfield said.

[Free Registration May Be Required]

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Monday, January 02, 2006

 

Education Review Publishes Brief Reviews for January 2006

Taken from a message on EDREV@ASU.EDU posted by Gene V Glass glass@ASU.EDU.

Education Review is an open access all-electronicjournal of book reviews residing at:

http://edrev.asu.edu

Education Review publishes brief reviews of new books monthly, and has just published brief reviews for January 2006.

These reviews can be accessed directly at:

http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/index.html

The books reviewed and their reviewers are as follows:

Ayers, William (2004). Teaching Toward Freedom: Moral Commitment and Ethical Action in the Classroom. Boston: Beacon Press. Reviewed by Kathleen E. Fite, Texas State University.

Bryson, Bethany (2005). Making Multiculturalism: Boundaries and Meaning in U.S. English Departments. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Reviewed by Nora Vince, Music Research Associates, Ontario, Canada.

Buckner, Aimee (2005). Notebook Know-How: Strategies for the Writer’s Notebook. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Publishers. Reviewed by Pariss Garramone, York University.

Culham, Ruth (2005). 6+1 Traits of Writing: The Complete Guide for the Primary Grades. New York: Scholastic. Reviewed by Venesser M. Pate, Monash University.

Handwerker, Mark J. (2004). Science Essentials, Middle School Level: Lesson and Activities for Test Preparation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Reviewed by Myka H. Raymond, Overland High School, Aurora, Colorado.

Hughes, Richard L. & Beatty, Katherine Colarelli (2005). Becominga Strategic Leader: Your Role in Your Organization's Enduring Success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Reviewed by Julius Sonko, Dallas Baptist University.

Johnson, Lou Anne (2005). Teaching Outside the Box: How to Grab Your Students By Their Brains. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Reviewed by Robert F. Walch, Monterey, California.

Kittle, Penny (2005). The Greatest Catch: A Life in Teaching. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Reviewed by Blake R. Bickham, University of Houston.

McGuinness, Diane (2005). Language Development and Learning to Read: The Scientific Study of How Language Development Affects Reading Skill. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Reviewed by Meeri Hellsten, Macquarie University.

Perfect, Kathy A. (2005) Poetry Lessons: Everything You Need. New York: Scholastic. Reviewed by Heidi Mullins, University of Houston.

Shaw, Darla (2005). Retelling Strategies to Improve Comprehension: Effective Hands-On Strategies for Fiction and Nonfiction That Help Students Remember and Understand What They Read. New York: Scholastic. Reviewed by Karen Csoli, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto.

Silverman, Franklin H. (2004). Self-Publishing Textbooks and Instructional Materials: A Practical Guide to Successful – and Respectable – Self-Publishing. Gloucester, MA: Atlantic Path Publishing. Reviewed by Beronda Montgomery, Michigan State University.

Sullivan, Jane & Madden, Midge (2004). Teaching the Elements of Powerful Writing: Using Great Fiction and Nonfiction Models. New York: Scholastic. Reviewed by Judine Ladbrook, The University of Auckland.

Wood, George H. (2005). Time To Learn: How to Create High Schools That Serve All Students. Second edition. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Reviewed by David E. Lee, University of Southern Mississippi.

_____________________________________________________
Kate Corby, Brief Reviews Editor
Gene V Glass, Editor
Gustavo Fischman, Editor for Spanish & Portuguese

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Sunday, January 01, 2006

 

Statistics for December

Okay, there were 257 visits to this blog last month from 205 unique visitors. This is broken down into 187 new or first time visitors and 18 return or repeat visitors. This is an average of 7 visitors per day.

We continue to get a worldwide audience, with visitors from the United States, Canada, the United Arab Emirates, Australia, India, Serbia And Montenegro, Taiwan, Israel, Portugal, Singapore, and New Zealand.

The websites that led more of these visitors to us than any others were Google and the main AERA website.

Popular pages this past month include:

The average visitor spent from 30 seconds to 5 minutes looking around the website, while there were two visitors that spent more than an hour.

Until next month...

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